Male Infertility

How Pesticides Might Affect Men’s Sexual Health

dailyRXMom's advice to eat plenty of veggies still rings true, but men might want to do so with some caution. High-pesticide fruits and vegetables might damage men's sexual health. A new study from Harvard found that men who ate vegetables and fruits with the highest levels of pesticide residues had lower sperm counts and fewer normal sperm.

Getting Healthy May Improve Men’s Fertility

dailyRXHealth problems that seem unrelated to men's fertility — like diabetes or high blood pressure — may damage men's sperm. And men can take steps that can both improve their overall health and make them more fertile.

Fitness Improves Outcomes for Infertile Couples

austinFitThere is no better field in medicine than fertility care for treating two people at the same time for optimal results. One unique aspect of fertility care is that it requires an in-depth understanding of multiple organ systems and their complex functions between two individuals. When reproductive endocrinologists and reproductive urologists work together, they areable to optimize fertility outcomes for the couple as a whole. Although evaluating and treating both partners optimizes fertility, couples can enhance their fertility with fitness. A fitter couple is a more fertile couple.

Exercise and Conception

austinFitFitness is clearly important for men and women’s health, but what about fitness' impact on fertility? Testosterone is believed to be an important factor in a man’s fertility. Low testosterone (total testosterone level of less than 300 ng/dl by the endocrine society definition) is very prevalent in infertile men. Forty-five percent of men with no sperm in the semen, without a blockage in the system transporting sperm, have low testosterone and 43% of men with low sperm counts have low testosterone levels.

Saint David’s South

stdavids Family of Physicians Practicing at St. David’s South Austin Medical Center, Helping Couples Achieve Fertility AUSTIN, TX—In August 2010, Parviz Kavoussi, M.D., joined St. David’s South Austin Medical Center, alongside his father, K.M. Kavoussi, M.D., and his brother, Shahryar Kavoussi, M.D. This family of physicians specializes in all aspects of fertility and reproductive medicine, focusing on both the female and male factors that can affect fertility in couples. “Our patients really like having all of these services offered in one office because it ensures that everyone is on the same page, so to speak,” Dr. Parviz Kavoussi said. “Examining infertility from both sides is the more effective, and less expensive, approach.”

Having Klinefelter Syndrome

tubesHaving Klinefelter Syndrome does not mean it is impossible to father children A common concern for males with KS and their families is the ability to father children. Although subfertility is characteristic of KS and the majority of KS men do not have sperm in the ejaculate, there are exceptions as well as other techniques to help with fertility potential. Although small, firm testes are common among all KS men, up to 50% have normal testosterone concentrations. Men with the mosaic form of KS (having 46XY cells mixed with 47XXY cells) are occasionally fertile. KS men with low sperm counts in the semen may have the sperm used for assisted reproductive techniques (such as in vitro fertilization- IVF) by simply collecting the sperm through semen samples obtained by masturbation.