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Want to get pregnant? Could your weight be holding you back? | Raising Austin

UnknownA new study from the National Institutes of Health looked at 501 couples from Michigan and Texas from 2005 to 2009 who were trying to get pregnant. It had the women chart their monthly cycles, intercourse and results of home pregnancy tests. It also looked at the body mass index of the couples and compared non-obese women and men...

How Pesticides Might Affect Men’s Sexual Health

dailyRXMom's advice to eat plenty of veggies still rings true, but men might want to do so with some caution. High-pesticide fruits and vegetables might damage men's sexual health. A new study from Harvard found that men who ate vegetables and fruits with the highest levels of pesticide residues had lower sperm counts and fewer normal sperm.

What Exercise Might Do for Men’s Sexual Health

dailyRXStaying active could benefit more than just heart health in men. In a recent study, older men who exercised reported less erectile dysfunction (ED).

How Even Borderline Low T Might Affect Your Health

dailyRXEven if you're close to having low testosterone but not quite there, you still might encounter some related health problems. A new study found that men with borderline testosterone levels had high rates of depression and other health problems.

Getting Healthy May Improve Men’s Fertility

dailyRXHealth problems that seem unrelated to men's fertility — like diabetes or high blood pressure — may damage men's sperm. And men can take steps that can both improve their overall health and make them more fertile.

Two Brothers, One Mission

Dr. Parviz Kavoussi and Dr. Shahryar Kavoussi are brothers and physicians both trying to help couples with fertility and work deligently to help their patients reach their goal of being able to have a child.  For men women and men alike, there are many factors involved if unable to conceive and both doctors at the Austin Fertility & Reproductive Medicine practice each discuss their specialties.

Fitness Improves Outcomes for Infertile Couples

austinFitThere is no better field in medicine than fertility care for treating two people at the same time for optimal results. One unique aspect of fertility care is that it requires an in-depth understanding of multiple organ systems and their complex functions between two individuals. When reproductive endocrinologists and reproductive urologists work together, they areable to optimize fertility outcomes for the couple as a whole. Although evaluating and treating both partners optimizes fertility, couples can enhance their fertility with fitness. A fitter couple is a more fertile couple.

Travis County Medical Society Member Spotlight

93C18BB3-E61C-4591-9BB3B280C4080BD5_smallInspired by his father’s dedication to his family and patients, Parviz K. Kavoussi, MD knew he wanted to follow in his footsteps and become a physician as well at the age of three. He began his pursuit early and volunteered in an emergency department at 15-years-old. To Dr. Kavoussi, the most rewarding aspect of his practice is being able to contribute to a patient’s quality of life and helping couples achieve their dreams of creating a family.

Reversing the Vasectomy

austinFitThe vas deferens: one of the vast differences between men and women. It is basically a small, hollow tube with the consistency of a wet noodle that allows the transit of sperm cells from the testicle on their way to the outside world to try to win the race and be the luckiest, or fittest, to reach and fertilize an egg. Why does it get so much attention in reproductive medicine?

Exercise and Conception

austinFitFitness is clearly important for men and women’s health, but what about fitness' impact on fertility? Testosterone is believed to be an important factor in a man’s fertility. Low testosterone (total testosterone level of less than 300 ng/dl by the endocrine society definition) is very prevalent in infertile men. Forty-five percent of men with no sperm in the semen, without a blockage in the system transporting sperm, have low testosterone and 43% of men with low sperm counts have low testosterone levels.